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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



■:J^5 'W^'-iS ^"'^JSSJ^'^V^'^'' 






THE SELFBALANCING SYSTEM 



OK 



GUTTING LADIES' GARMENTS, 



BY 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER, 

INCLTTDING SCALKS OF THE SEIaF-BALAKCING SYSTEM 

FOR CUTTING. 



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F-UBIvISHKD IN NEW YORK BY 

DITTMAR & SHEIFER, 

Authors of Dittmar & Sheifer's Self Balancing S5^stem of Cutting Gents' and Bo3^s' Gar- 
ments. D. & S. Proportions on Ladies' and Children's Garments. D. & S. 
Proportions on Men's, Youth's, Bo3^s' and Children's Garments. 
D. & S. Self-Balancing System of Cutting vShirts. 
D. & S. Book on Grading, etc. , etc. 




FOR CONTENTS, CONSULT INDEX ON LAST PAGE. 








^%^^ 



Entered according to Act of Congress in the year iSyi by DITTMAR & SHEIFER, in tlie Otiice of the 

Librarian of Congress at Washington. 



CAUTION. — A legal right to use this work must show its couveyanoe to the subscriber by its number and 
license, with the signatures of the Authors. 

Any infringement or unauthorized use will be prosecuted to the full extent of the Law, it having been 
decided by the Librarian that the contents are fully covered and protected by the copyright/' 



No. of Book, 



I 




Authors, 



PRESS OF NEUMANN BROS., 210 FULTON ST., N. Y. 



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DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 




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CUSTOM DEPARTMENT 



Tailors' and Hutters' Exchan|B. 



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HE facilities of this Academy for imparting reliable and thorough instruction in Ladies' and Gents' Garment Cutting 
are not equaled iu this country. The systems taught have received the unqualified indorsement of the Cutting 
fraternity as correct in theory and reliable in practice. To those who are not practical Cutters the charge is One 
Hundred Dollars for a thorough and complete course of instruction in Garment Cutting ; but to Practical 
Cutters, not occupying more than one week or ten days at the outside in learning, the charge is Fifty Dollars. 
The time occupied by students in acquiring a perfect knowledge of Cutting averages from three to six iveeks. 
No limit is placed upon the time to be occupied by young beginners, as we desire that they shall not leave 
the Academy until ive are satisfied of their efficiency. 

The Academy is open for instruction daily (Saturday and Sunday excepted) from lo a.m. to 3 p.m., and pupils ^may 
commence at any time. 






WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT 



TailoFs' and CuUbps' ExclianjB. 







DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



PREFACE. 



^Ilfcf N presenting this work, we have the as- 
mwMMi\i surance of meeting tlie Avants of the 

FW^^ trade, bv furnishing a system of actual 

Wn " . 1 • ■ 

^ V measurement, combining pure geo- 

t metrical principles with simplicity, in 

fi drafting all styles of over and under- 

coats, with the use of tape-measure only; it is a 
system of measuring and drafting that will 
reach every shape, thereby giving us the high 
or low shoulder, erect or stooping form, vshoul- 
der, backward or forwards, narrow or wide arm- 
scye, narrow or widebackstrop; in fact, produc- 
ing a correct draft for all forms in as simple a 
manner as possible. 

With pleasure we call the attention of the 
public in general, especially the Tailors, to our 
" New and Imi'rovkd Svstf.m " of cutting perfect 
fitting garments, a S3"steni simple in its con- 
struction, based on mathematical and practical 
principles, which can easih' be mastered, and 
wnll compensate the pupil a thousand times over 
with its results. It has afforded many years of 
study and experimenting, and stands without a 
rival in Europe and America. 



ITS SIMPLICITY. 



The greatest importance attached to all 
mechanism is its simplicity; without it we have 
complications which are liable to get out of 
order and cause trouble, but when ever3?tliiiig is 
simple there are fewer chances of its causing an- 
noyance and trouble. So it is with a system; 



too mau}^ of them being so complicated and call 
for so many measures, etc., that a student is 
perplexed at the multiplicit}^ of his work and 
the numerous changes necessary to be made to 
successfully work the SA^stem. 

We would guard you against learning a 
system containing too many calculations; the 
more simple they are, the less liable you are to 
err in using them. 



ITS RELIABILITY. 



In an engine the desideratum to be attained 
is reliabilit3^ When this point is satisfactorily 
settled there is no hesitanc}' upon the part of 
the builders to recommend it. The}' are then 
satisfied that its work will be thoroughly done, 
and the}' have no fear of failure. 

In this S3^stem of cutting its reliability has 
been settled be3^ond a question, and we have 
the proofs to offer which are open to the inspec- 
tion of all interested parties. 



ITS SWIFTNESS OF EXECUTION. 



In these days of hurry, when time is reck- 
oned so valuable that minutes as well as hours 
are considered, we all aim to economize time 
as much as possible; "time is mone}'," there- 
fore it is desirable in selecting a S3'stem to get 
one that produces good results and consumes 
the least time in drafting the garment, for in so 
doing we are selecting the best-p.-wing system. 

This S3'stem is not onh' simple in its con- 
struction, reliable in its results, but occupies 
less time to make a correct draft than any other 
offered. Hence it is pre-eminently to your ad- 
vantage to learn it, for "economy is wealth." 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 




OUR SYSTEM OF CUTTING. 



The all-important question to be decided by 
every student in search of a system for garment 
cutting is, which is the best systetn iatight ? 

He is met on the very threshold by the clam- 
orous multitude of system teachers, all claim- 
ing, ''par excellence,'' iox their respective systems, 
which so confuses and perplexes him that, in 
despair, he is inclined to give up the search and 
denounce "the whole race." 

In all "callings" as well as in theology 
there are "true as well as false teachers," and 
in many cases it is difficult to decide between 
them. But we must remember that, because 
there are ' ' false teachers " is no sufficient reason 
to denounce all. In all things we must discrim- 
inate, and, to a large degree, frame our judg- 
ment upon what we believe the most reliable 
evidence offered for our consideration, and not 
allow ourselves to be attracted as are the swarm- 
ing bees by the din and clatter of noisy bells, 
tin horns, etc. 

While this is true regarding things in gen- 
eral, it is particular!}^ true of all who are in 
search of a system. 



We should not be allured by the one making 
the loudest outcry — ' 'a barking dog never bites. " 
You can appl)^ the moral. 

You should act calmly and only after search- 
ing investigation. One of the surest tests of 
an3^thing is the result — a pudding's worth can 
onl}' be decided b}^ eating of it — a S3^stem's 
worth can only be known by the standard and 
standing of its scholars. This is meant in a 
general sense, for you will admit that there are 
exceptions to all riiles, and it is impossible for 
professors to impart brains where none exist; 
hence a good system is occasionally condemned 
when, in fact, the fault is to be iittributed to 
the want of artistic abilit}" on the part of the 
student. 

Cutters who are unsuccessful in their profes- 
sion invariabl}^ attribute their failure to the 
system learned by them. ln(|uiry establishes 
the fact that, instead of the system being at 
fault, nine times out of ten it is the man him- 
self. 

Incompetenc}' and lack of ability only are 
the causes of his failure. 

As a rule most of the S3^stems have some 
good points — many are defective — a few are 
good, and none perfect; therefore, the object is 
to find the one as near perfection as possible; 
and the best and surest wa}" to judge of this is 
to definiteh^ settle in your mind which S3^s- 
tem gives the greatest satisfaction in the most 
cases, and is most general!}^ endorsed by the 
successful cutters. 

In such a search, and b}^ an unprejudiced 
person, the Tailors' and Cutters' Exchange have 
no fear of being passed by, being confident that 
the sj^stem of cutting as taught b}' Dittmar & 
Sheifer presents points of excellence offered by 
few if anv other s^'stem, and its endorsement 
by the most skilled cutters of this city is suf- 
ficient guarantee of its excellence without our 
entering into long columns of praise and lauda- 
tion of its merits. 

But, for the benefit of those who ma}' not 
be acquainted with the workings of this system, 
and the better to allow them to judge of its 
qualities, we will briefly mention its chief at- 
tractive points, viz., simplicity, reliability, and 
swiftness of execution. 



UITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



THE TAILORS' & CUTTERS' EXCHANGE 



The Tailors' and Cutters' Exchange, who 
are the publishers of this work, has been estab- 
lished for a number of 3^ears, and has alwa3^s 
been held in high esteem by all who have be- 
come acquainted with its merits. It has had a 
steady and prosperous growth from its birth, 
and has alwa3^s maintained its name for integ- 
rit}' and true worth. 

No loud-mouthed trumpets of brass have 
been engaged to sound its praise or proclaim its 
virtues, but it has gradually and quietly worked 
its wa}" up from a small beginning until now it 
is an acknowledged power in the land, and its 
friends and patrons are to be found in all sec- 
tions of this extensive country. Our students 
are from every State in the Union and Canadas. 
and its graduates are to be found scattered all 
over the land. Among the faculty and mem- 
bers of "The Exchange" will be found some of 
the best-known tailors and cutters of this city 
and countr3% and our magazine and its illustra- 
trations will be under their surveillance; conse- 
quently the public can rely upon always having 
the newest designs and most approved styles, 
eminating from the acknowledged leaders of 
st3'le and fashion. 

We have many advantages for the truthful 
portrayal of fashions over all of our competitors; 
their boasts to the contrary notwithstanding. 
But of this we will say no more, as we prefer to 
have the interested public judge for thern- 
selves and choose between us, feeling assured 
that our works and their superiority will speak 
for themselves. 



THE POWER OF MEMORY. 



A correspondent of J^ature tells a curious 
story of an American waiter at the New York 
Filth Avenue Hotel, who can take charge of 
five hundred hats at once, and always return 
the right hat to the owner, though most of the 



five hundred owners, and, of course, most of 
their hats, are completely strange to him. 

This waiter says that he ' ' forms a mental 
picture of the owner's face inside of the hat, and 
that on looking at any hat the wearer's face is 
instantly brought before his mind's e3^e. " Here, 
then, if the account be accurate, is another case 
of a memor3' indefinately strengthened by a 
power of visualizing impressions which most 
men never visualize at all. This man visualizes 
hats with faces under them, as great chess pla3^- 
ers who pla3' without the board visualize the 
pieces set in particular squares; only this is a 
more remarkable exercise of the same power, 
since five hundred hats must contain many 
nearly exact copies of each other, while none of 
the sixt3'-four squares on a chess-board need 
be confused together at all by an3^ one who can 
make himself any accurate picture of them. 

While this may appear "fish3^" there is 
more truth in it than a casual reader will give 
credit. We will not maintain that it is "the 
whole truth and nothing but the truth," but we 
believe that to a certain extent it is true. Some 
men possess remarkable faculties for connecting 
objects. We occasionall3' meet men who imme- 
diately recall the name of a person upon seeing 
his face; others associate places of residence 
with the face, etc. 

But what we wish to impress upon our read- 
ers by the above is, that it is a good thing for 
all cutters to cultivate this faculty. It is well to 
acquire the habit of photographing the shapes, 
st3des, etc. , of their customers. By some device 
tlie3^ should learn to impress indelibly upon 
their minds an exact counterpart of the various 
customers the3^ measure; they should so study 
this subject that b3^ "looking over their man" 
they could produce, as it were, a. facsimile of him 
upon paper b3^ simply associating the measures 
taken with certain "points" they have noted 
down in their mind. 

We are positive this is a faculty that can be 
cultivated to advantage by every cutter, and we 
think it is his duty to cultivate it, for 133^ so do- 
ing he fosters and gives life to an element which 
goes far towards helping him to successfulh' 
draft his patterns so as to overcome the various 
defects which may exist in his customer and 
his system for cutting. 



DITTMAR & SHEIFERS SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



THE DIGNITY OF TAILORING. 



A great number of persons are disposed to 
deride the calling of a tailor, and many 3'oung 
men may be deterred from learning the trade 
on this account. If an}' such should read this 
article, let them remember that tailors stand 
about as high, as a profession, as any other, as 
proven by the difficulty of making a good tailor 
out of a law3'er, while vaany tailors have proved 
successful lawyers and surpassed as counselors, 
and a few have made able statesmen. Of the 
latter, President Andrew Johnson, whatever 
may have been thought b}^ some of his polic3^ 
it has been frequently acknowledged by man}^ 
able men since his death that his state papers 
are the most correct and able of an}^ since the 
da3^s of Thomas Jefferson. 

But, after all, who of modern tailors are 
justl}^ entitled to the tribute paid to the memor}' 
of Pasquin, the Roman tailor, who was re- 
garded as the wittiest man in Rome, and after 
his death, two thousand years ago, they raised 
a marble monument in Rome to his memorv, 
which remains to this day in nearl}^ the centre 
of the city? No one, unless it be Andrew 
Johnson. It is true that very many tailors have 
been Lord Mayors of London, and Bai-on Stults 
was not only an excellent tailor, but he im- 
proved the d^'es and tints of cloths, and invented 
the best factor}^ for making superior cloths of 
an}^ one in England. 

Nine journeymen tailors once made a very 
wealth}^ merchant, who had lettered on the 
panel of his coach, "Nine tailors made the 
man." This was done in honor of the noble 
members of the craft who had made his fortune 
b}^ donations to establish him in business. But 
b}^ the conceptions of the following age, when 
literary scamps found it impossible to get credit 
with the tailor, the}^ turned the compliment in- 
to blackguardism by rendering it thus: "It 
takes nine tailors to make a man." Even 
Shakespeare was not free from the taint, as 
shown in some of his plays, in which he endeav- 
ored to disgrace the tailor. It is an hororable 
calling, and no one should blush with shame 
for being numbered among its members. 



A WORD TO CUTTERS AND TAILORS. 



Life indeed is short, and the few years we 
are permitted to live should not be one-sided — 
in a word, we should live in a measure for, 
others as well as for ourselves. This should be 
the aim and life-work of a good tailor or cutter. 
The tailor should not wait until after years on 
the bench have passed to begin to learn cut- 
ting, for then, constantly' in a cramped condi- 
tion when his limbs are supple, he will find them, 
in old age, shaky and so enfeebled as not to be 
able to stand for an}' given length of time. A 
young man begins and learns cutting thoroughl}', 
and, thereafter, all other branches of the pro- 
fession become eas)' and pleasurable tasks. 
One of the best cutters and tailors in the pro- 
fession came to our Acadeni}' the other day and 
applied for a situation, which was speedily 
obtained for him in one of the leading custom 
establishments in the city, and you can imagine 
our surprise when he again visited us, in a few 
da3'S, saying that he was obliged to leave his 
situation owing to the feebleness of his legs; 
that it was ph3'sically impossible for him to 
stand any considerable length of time This 
is an illustration which should convey its les- 
son to every cutter especially, for, this man, 
after many years an expert tailor, became, in 
the same degree, a cutter, but in his old da3's 
was practically useless as such. So begin cut- 
ting when young and 3'ou will have in your 
old age a profession that will prove a blessing 
to 3'ourself especiall3', and to those who ma3' 
have to depend upon 3'ou. Now your especial 
attention is called to the fact that it is not b3' 
any means an edif3''ing sight to see a cutter on 
his knees measuring a customer for length of 
garment, and we make it an invariable rule to 
instil into the mind of the student never to 
kneel, but in ever3' instance if they have not a 
platform in the establishment in which the3' 
may be employed, to procure a box and drape 
same with carpet or an}' other suitable material 
and let their customers stand thereon, and thus 
they will add a .little ray of lustre to the pro- 
fession, and, among other things, it will ma- 
terially help them to obtain a correct measure. 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 1. 



THE MEASUREMENTS 

ON LADIES' GARMENTS, 



-BY- 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S 

5elf-Bala9ei9(5 System of ^uttipc^ 

TO BE TAKEN OVER THE WAIST. 



The measure ousj;ht to be taken with ease 
and dispatch, and it lias a ]>ad appearance to be 
moving around 3'our customer; placing your- 
self behind him, 3'ou can do all the measure- 
ment without change of position. It is of great 
importance that 3^our customer should not as- 
sume a forced or unnatiiral position; to avoid 
this difficulty, address them on some subject to 
attract their attention. Be also very careful, 
in measuring, to place the measure close to 
the bod3^ neither tight, loose, nor crooked. 
Applv the measure around the arm with your 
linger, in order to bring the looseness of the 
waist close to the bod3^; take all of the same 
tightness, and those from the socket bone with- 
out departing from it. 

The success of a garment depends greatl3^ 
on the balance which the measurement can 
ascertain. However, it must not be lost sight 
of that the human bod3^ is not a statue, and 
that the greatest care to seize the opportunit3" 
of having it in its natural position is of the 
greatest importance. It is not unusual that 
persons having a stooping attitude, erect them- 
selves when tlie3^ are to be measured. Take 
notice of it, and add, sa3^ % or '\ inch on the 
nape measure according to 3^our remark on their 
forced attitude, and all these points will locate 
themselves. 

1^^ A brass belt should be used in all cases, 
when measuring a customer, in order to get the 
correct measurements of around and length of 
waist, balance measure, etc. 

On placing the belt around the customer's 
waist, take hold of the belt with the buckle in 
3"0ur right hand; then place 3^our belt around 



the waist catching the belt with the left hand. 
Now place the other end of the belt in the 
buckle drawing it tight with the left hand to 
suit customer; after doing this fasten catch 
which 3^ou will find in end of belt. 

Belts can be had of Dittmar & Sheifer from 
$1.50 up, according to sizes. Sizes rtui from 
30 to 50 inches. 

A. Take position behind the customer for 
measuring. Make a mark on the socket bone, 
point A. — See Fig. i. 

B. Make a mark at the centre of back 
level with depth of arm hole. You ma3^ place 
a straight line from the depth of arm to the cen- 
tre of back, point B. —See Fig. 1 . 

1. Blade measure from point A, over the 
shoulder, around the arm. See that 3^our meas- 
ure be placed in good order and close to the 
Arm, and coming to the centre of the back, sa3^ 
2 2" 2 inches. — See Fig. i. 

2. Nape measure from point A to B, sa3' 
7';, inches. — See Fig. i. 

3. Length of waist from point A, sa3" 16 
inches. — See Fig. 1. 

4. Total length of garment according to 
st3de of garment. 

5. Width of shoulder from point A to the 
top of shoulder bone, sa3' ;'< inches. — See Fig. i. 

6. Depth of arm hole. Place a pencil or 
an3^ other straight line under the arm. Take 
depth of arm-hole from point A to the depth of 
arm, sa3' ii'< inches. — See Fig. 2. 

7. Front balance from point A over the 
shoulder straight down to front centre of waist, 
sa3' 20 inches. — See Fig. 2. 

8. Length of sleeves, from point A on 
socket bone over the shoulder, in front of arm 
down to the wrist, say 29 inches. — See Fig. 2. 

9. Bust. Over the largest part of the chest 
and over the blade, say 36 inches. 

10. Around waist, sa3" 24 inches. 

11. Hip. 4 inches below waist, say 38 
inches. 

12. Seat. About 8 inches below waist, 
sa3" 46 inches. 



20V 



-7-<- 



FULL MEASUREMENT. 



■ 1 6—7%— 1 1 V,— 20— 28— 36— 24— 38— 46 



Plate 1. 




DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 2. 

DRAFTING THE OUTLINES. 

THE OUTLINES OF A LADIES' GARMENT WHATEVER IT 

MAY BE. 



This is the foundation of the garment by 
drafting after Dittmar & Sheifer's Self-Balanc- 
ing System of Cutting Ladies' Garments. 



MEASUREMENTS. 



Blade, 
Nape, - 
Length of Waist, 
Total Length, 
Width of Shoulder, 
Depth of Arm, 



7 '4 
1 6 



Front Balance, 

Length of Sleeve, 

Bust, 

Waist, 

Hip, 

Seat, - 



29 

24 
3S 
46 



1. Draw a line on bottom edge of paper. 

2. Square line 2 b}^ line i. vSee your line 
2 to be perfect, squared with line i. 

3. Blade measure (ist measure) 22', in- 
ches. Apply 22", on scale No. i, from line i to 
3, draw central line. 

4. Depth of arm 11";, inches (6th measure). 
Apply II \ inches from line 2 to 4. Square line 
up. 

5. Nape measure (second measure) 7';,. 
inches. Apply 7'., inches from line 4 to 5 on 
line I. 

6. Length of waist (3d measure) 16 inches. 
Apply 16 inches from point 5 to 6 on line i. 

7. 1% inches from point 6 to 7. 

8. . Draw a line from points 5 to 7. 

9. Square a line up b}" line 8. 

10. Width of shoulder (5th measure) 7', 
inches. Apph^ 7', inches from point 5 to icon 
line 9. 

11. Blade measure (ist measure) 22', in- 
ches. Apply 22'4 on scale No. 2 from line 3 to 
1 1 on line 4. Draw a line from 10 to 11. 

12. Measure the distance from point lo to 
1 1, and take the third part of the said distance 
from ID to 12. 



13. In the centre between point 1 1 and 1 2. 

14. Measure the distance between line 3 
and point 1 1 (say 5 inches), take the same 5 on 
scale No 3 from point 5 on line 9. 

15. From line 2 to 15 the same as there is 
from 5 to 14. Square line up by line 3. 

16. Blade measure (ist measure) 22% in- 
ches. Placing X on line 2. Apply 22% on scale, 
No. 2, on line 3. 

1 7. DraW' a line b}^ point 1 6 to point 5, then 
square a line b}" point 16 up to point 17. This 
locates the neck shoulder point. 

18. Bust measure (9th measure) 36 inches. 
Apply half from line 8 to 18 on line 4. 

19- Allow^ance for seams, according to 
thickness of material and seams preferred, from 
2 to 3 inches from point 18 to 19. Draw line 
down squared b}^ line 4. 

20. Measure the distance from line 3 to 
point 18, say 7 inches. Apply 7 on scale No. 3 
to X from point 1 7 to 20 on line 1 5. Draw a line 
from 20 to 19. 

21. Measure the distance from point 20 to 

19 and apply the third part of the distance from 

20 to 21. Now draw a line from 2 1 to 13, 

22- Front balance ( 7th measure) 20 inches. 
Apply 20 inches from line 2 to 22 on line 19. 
Now draw a line from point 7 to 22. This line 
gives the natural waist. 

23- Measure the distance from point 19 to 

22 and appl}^ the third of the distance from 19 
to 23 on line 19. Now place your ruler on point 

23 adjoining lines i and 4, and draw a line from 
point 23 to about line 3. This line gives 3^011 
the height of darts. 

The above shows the perfectability of our 
measurement S3'stem and the corresponding 
result of the drafting wdiich the attentive stu- 
dent can rely upon as perfect guide to all the 
various forms. 

In drafting any pattern of any measure 
you draft in the same way. You will find the 
like result of the above which is a certain proof 
of the correctness of our Self-Balancing System. 

Drafting the garment see next page. 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 3. 



DRAFTING A GARMENT, 



BY THE SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



A. Width of shoulder accordinj^ to style 
and taste, about %inch from point 12. 

B. Width of back from 2 to 2', inches. 

0. I", inches from B to C. 

D. Side body on line 3. 

E. In the centre, between D and C, take out 
y^ of an inch (these three parts). Side bodies 
and back must have the fourth part of waist, 
(6 inches) allowing for seams on waist. 

F. I' 2 inches from line 3 for arm-hole. 
Make front shoulder same length as back. 

G. ' anch from line 3. 

H. In the centre between point 23, and 
line 3, draw a line down from point H. 

1. Measure from point 22 to G, deduct the 
fourth part of waist measure (6 inches) and take 
out balance on front dart. Make allowance for 
seams. 

K. Seven inches below waist allow one 
inch up from straight line ; now draw a line 
from point 22, this gives the spring of the gar- 
ment below waist on the front. 

This line should be continued for spring of 
long garments. 

Hip measure is 38. Appl}^ 38 inches 4 in- 
ches below waist, make allowance for seams. 
Seat measure 46 inches. Appl}^ 46 inches 8 
inches below waist, making allowance for 

seams. 



CUTTING OUT THE PATTERN. 



These two measures can be applied after 
the draft is finished; should your draft measure 
more than hip and seat calls for, you can break 
oft" equall}^ on each part, or if the same meas- 
ures less, 3'oumust allow the same wa}^ equalh' 
on each part so as to correspond with the meas- 
urements. 

Allow I/-; inches on the front for the buttons 
and holes for single-breasted, and from 2% to 
3', inches for double-breasted, according to lap. 



Before j^ou cut out your pattern look it over 
carefull}^ b}^ running 3'our ruler over the same 
lines and measuring the different points, it will 
be eas}^ to correct any mistake while 5'our draft 
is intact, but after being cut out it will be very 
difficult to make changes. 

In cutting out the pattern it will prove 
more valuable to cut every part full, so you 
must in each case trace each side body out first, 
to do this place a clean paper under your draft, 
trace first one side body ( with a tracing 
wheel), then after doing this cut it out, being 
careful to notch it at the waist. 

Now trace the other side bod}' and cut it 
out, not forgetting the notches at the waist. 

The back and front can be cut out from 
your draft. 

Notches for sleeves to be placed for forepart 
% of an inch above bust line, the back notch 
should be placed at the top and centre of side 
hodj. 



IMPORTANCE AFTER CUTTING OUT. 

It is ver}' important for ever}' cutter to put 
the date, measurements and name of customer 
on the pattern. For draft of sleeve see next 
Plate. 



TAILORS' AND CUTTERS' EXCHANGE. 





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DITTMAR &• SHEIFER, Pkoprietoks 




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14 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 4. 



DRAFTING A SLEEVE. 



Measure the top of armhole from notch on 
forepart to the top of centre of back-side-bod \'. 
sav 1 1 inches (see Plate 3). Now measure the 
underarm from notch to notch, sa_Y 7 inches 
(see Plate 3). 

1. DraAv line 1. 

2- Square line 2 b\' line i. 

3- Top armhole measure 11 inches. Apply 
1 1 inches from line i to 3. 

4- From line 2 to 4, the same distance as 
there is from point A to notch of side body (see 
Plate 3). 

5. From line 2 to 5, same distance as there 
is from A to bust line (see Plate 3). 

6- In the centre between lines 1 and 3. 

7- From line 5 to 7, V^ of an inch, same as 
from l)ust line to notch of forepart (see Plate 3). 

8- Underarm measure 7 inches. Appl}^ 
'/ inch less (6"1 inches) from point 7 to 8 on 
line 4. 

9- Sleeve length measure 29 inches, de- 
duct depth of armhole measure (11', inches) 
and appl}' the balance of measure from line 5 
to 9. 

10- In the centre between point 9 and 
line 5, draw back elbow i inch lower. 

Bottom of sleeve for plain ordinary stvle, 
cut the bottom i inch more than the fourth 
part of bust measure. 36 inches bust, make 
sleeve 10 inches wide on bottom, allowance 
extra for seams. 

Divide the bottom of sleeve so your under 
sleeve should be about 2 inches narrower than 
the upper. Extend both % of an inch forward 
on bottom. Cut upper sleeve in elbow i inch 
from line i and 3', inches for under sleeve, 
hollow the front of sleeve i'_, inches in elbow. 

For plain sleeve with ordinary fullness cut 
\our sleeve up to line 2, for high putf from 3 to 5 
inches above line 2 (largest part of puff on line 6 ). 



DRAFTING THE COLLARS. 



Fig. 1. The plain tailor made turn down 
collar. Draw a line from position 3'ou want 
roll to start from up to the neck-shoulder point. 
A, I inch below for crease of collar. B, from 
shoulder to B, same as width of the top of the 
back. Width of collar in back is cut from 3 to 
3',> inches. Width of front collar is cut accord- 
ing to st3de and taste. 

Fig. 2. The Shawl Collar is cut in the 
same manner as Fig. i, but about 2% inches 
wider on back, and curve your collar in to the 
front same as shown on diagram. Fig. 2. 

Fig. 3- The Medici Collar. This collar 
should be cut with a big hollow on back in order 
that the collar should have plenty of spring on 
the back of the lady's head. 

Fig. 4- The Sailor Collar. Place vour 
back and front together with the shoulder seam, 
after doing so collar will be ver}" eas}' to get by 
the shape of the neck, back, etc. ( See diagram 
Fig. 4-^ 

Fig. 5- The Standing and common Turn 
Down Collar. Draw a line, A, 'of an inch 
curve on front. Now apply the neck measure 
b}' measuring neck of front and back. The 
turn down collar is shown on the same, Fig. 5. 
Allow I inch of crease in back and '^ inch in 
front. 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 



No one, except in this Academ3\ is author- 
ized to, nor capable of, teaching any of our 
S3'stems. Gents or ladies and any one under- 
dertaking to do so wrongfully and imposes on 
the trade. We teach our students how to cut, 
but we do not teach them how to teach. The instruc- 
tion we give a student is given him for his per- 
sonal use onl3^ and if he teaches another for 
pay he is moralh' guilty of a breach of trust, 
and those interested should not permit them- 
selves to be imposed on. 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 5. 



DRAFTING A LOOSE FRONT GARMENT. 



Wnil (Ik WITHOUT VEST. 



Front side bod_y should be cut '^^ of an inch 
turther front than for tii.^ht fitting, talce out 
from side to front on waist I'^inch. Front 
from waist up slioidd be cut % of an incli shorter 
than side bod}', this should be done for all loose 
fronts, as the front must be stretched in order 
to smooth out the wrinkles which generall}^ 
appear on a loose front garment at the waist. 

Cutting the front of forepart for a loose and 
straight front, single or double breasted, see G 
and Gx on next plate. 



THE VEST. 

Front of vest is cut same as front of Plate 
3. Average length of vest, from 5 to 6 inches in 
front and 2 inches on side. Front dart of vest 
divide the same as on Plate 3. For vest with 
full back, see Plate 17. 



THE BEAUTY OF A GARMENT. 



The success of a cutter does not alwa3's de- 
pend in cases of a smooth tit. We know of 
some cutters whose garments are always fitting 
to perfection, but no shape to them at all — 
this is spoiled by refitting. 

The principal we claim in our S3'stem is the 
shape of all curves as well as the fitting. If 
measurements are taken with care you are sure 
of a perfect fit ; no need of alteration. There- 
fore your shape and curves will remain as 
designed in drafting your pattern. 



THE PECUNIARY VALUE OF TASTE. 



In general we have a ver}' inadequate ap- 
preciation of the pecuniar_v value of taste. 

Taste measurabl}^ supplies a deficiency of 
means in almost everything. 

How often do we see a cheap but tasteful!}' 
planned and arranged cottage excelling in at- 
tractiveness the costly but ill-contrived dwell- 
ing ! 

The difference between taste and the want 
of it is strikingly manifest in the laying out of 
grounds and planting trees and shrubs. 

It is also manifest in other ways. One 
person always appears well dressed, another 
never; yet the one wdio is ill-dressed may pa}' 
his tailor twice as much a year as the other. 

One who does not understand the adaption 
of style and colors may be loaded wdth costly 
garments and finery, and yet never appear well 
dressed. 

To some persons taste in everything seems 
natural, but in all it admits of cultivation. And 
the cultivation of one's taste not only saves 
money, but it is a' source of much satisfaction 
and happiness. 



:*'<• 







Plate 5. 




iS 



DITTMAR & SHEIFERS SELF-BALANCING vSYSTEM. 



Plate 6. 



DRAFTING A PLUSH GARMENT. 



JACKETS, SAC(JUES, NEWMARKETS, ETC. 



Heavy Cloth Garments Lined are cut in the same way. 



18 to 19 allow 3 inches. 

A. Width of back from 3 to 3'/; inches. 

B. From A to B 1% inches. 

C. From line 3 1% inches. 

D. Take out i "/, inches from C to D. 

E. For armhole 2% inches from line 3. 

F. Neck shoulder point to be placed i inch 
above point 1 7. 

G and G X. In a square ' ^ of an inch 
below point 18. 

H. Allow two inches for ordinary lap of 
sack; 3 inches for double breasted Jacket or 
Newmarket. Facing should be allowed on 
front of garment for all loose fronts (will not 
work well for tight). 



DRxVFTING THE BOTTOM OF A SACK OR NEWMARKET. 

I. For sack or Newmarket, i inch from 
line I. 

J. Width of back on bottom the sixth part 
of bust measure. 

K. Draw side-bod)^ in the centre of back 
on bottom. 

L. Width of side-body for sack the fourth 
part of bust, and for Newmarket cut the same 
I ' ; inches more. 

M. Front for Sack i inch from J ; for New- 
market run it down to point J. Collar is already 
given on Plate 4, Fig. 2. 



SPECIAL FOR FURRIERS. 




Seal Skin, or other 
fur garments, of course, 
does not need the allow- 
ance for seams as cloth 
garments, but '/g of an 
inch for each seam should 
be considered taken in 
from each part. 

The main allowance 
for skin garments is for 
the lining, if quilted lin- 
ing, allowance of 2 in- 
ches must be made from 
points 18 to 19. If plain 
lining i "^ inch is enough. 
The same allowance 
should be made on waist 
and hip. Width of back 
i^ should be cut ''.inch nar- 
rower. Shoulder must 
l)e cut much narrower as 
for cloth. If tight fitting, 
two darts should be 

placed in forepart instead of one. All other 

points should be done the same as given on 

Plates 2 and 3. '; 

For cloth garments lined with fur allowance 

must be made besides the regular allowance as 

follows : 



Blade, 


- 22^4 inches. 


Bust, - 


- 36 inches. 


Depth of Arm, ii>^ in 


Allow, - 


- I " 


Allow. 


- - 2 


Allow, - - - % " 


Cut, - 


- 23K " 


Cut - 


- 38 '■ 


Cut, - - - 12X " 



Waist, hip and seat should be allowed same 
as bust. 



OUR SUCCESS WITH FURRIERS. 



During the past few years our classes have 
grown considerably larger with students in that 
department, learning the art of designing for 
fur garments ; their success cannot be equaled 
with any other system of cutting, in producing 
such faultless style and fit of which we hold 
testimonials. 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 7. 



DRAFTING A WRAP. 



SHORT OR LONG, JAPANESE OR OTHER SLEEVES. 



Fig. I. 

The extra measurements requiring for 
Wrap Sleeve. 

B. Elbow measure, from point A (or socket- 
bone) to the front of elbow, say i6 inches. 

C. Total length, continue 3"0ur measure- 
ment to the wrist, say 24 inches. 




Our supplement of cutting wraps, which 
has proven the most valuable work invented, 
and used only by our Mr. Shelter in his private 
practice. See Plate 14. 



DRAFTING. 



Cut the armhole 2 inches below line 4, bust 
line. Start back side-body from bust line. 
Other point same as Plate 3. 

A. Elbow measure, 16 inches. Apply 16 
inches from line 2 to A. Draw line up. 

B. The eighth part of bust, 4", inches, 
from armhole to line B. 

C. In the centre between lines B and 3, 

D. From line B to D, the third part as 
there is from line C to B. 

E. Total length of sleeve, 24 inches De- 
duct elbow, 16 inches, and apply the balance, 
8 inches, from line B to E on line A; this com- 
pletes the points for top sleeve. Back on waist 
to be cut from 2' 1 to 3 inches wide, and run it 
down with one curve from shoulder seam (.See 
Diagram). 



F. 
G. 

H. 

inches, 



THE JAPANESE SLEEVE. 

From 10 to 12 inches from E to F. 
Under-sleeve 4 inches less as upper. 
According to style and taste about 3 
and 2 inches extra for turn up, below 
waist line. 

X. Notch for sleeve i inch above D, or 
line 3. Start your under-sleeve from the same 
point and curve it i inch lower in front. See 
point O. 

I, Bottom for Japanese under-sleeve 6 
inches above bottom of upper-sleeve, also 4 
inches narrower in width, as the upper-sleeve 
should be gathered on bottom in order to form 
a shape of a curve on bottoin of Japanese 
Sleeve. 

J. Represents open sleeves on bottom. 
This is, of course, a matter of taste and st3de. 

K. Represents how under-sleeve is cut for 
open bottom sleeves of all descriptions. Cut 
3^our under sleeve for the same about 7 inches 
wide in front. 

Long wraps, such as Dolman, Raglan, etc., 
sleeve to be cut in the same wa}'. For body see 
page 1 8, Plate 6. 

Spring wrap ma}" be cut without side bod3^ 
and elastic band is fastened on waist and under- 
arm to hold the front in shape. Open bottom 
sleeve is mostl}^ worn for the same. 



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DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 8. 




CUTTING THE 
SHOULDER CAPES. 



All measurements 
required for a shoul- 
der cape is bust, neck 
and length. Drafting 
a shoulder cape say 36 
inch bust, take a 36 inch 
l)ust pattern, no differ- 
ence what style of a 
garment, all 3'ou want 
is the shape of the 
shoulders and neck. 



DRAFTING A HIGH SHOULDER CAPE. 



Draw a line up. 

A to B. Bust measure 36 inches, apply 
one half of bust and allow the eighth part of 
bust to it, which makes 22'/, inches from A to 
B. Now place 3^our back pattern with bust line 
(or line 4) on point A. 

C. 1 inch below line. This point can 
he moved lower if you don t want much puff on 
sleeve, or can be moved less than i inch below 
line if higher putf is wanted. 

Now place your forepart with bust line (or 
line 4) on point B. 

D. I inch below line. This point should 
be moved same as point C. 

E. Allow I inch on shoulder of back in 
order to bring seam of cape more on the centre 
of shoulder. 

F. Break off ' , inch from forepart shoidder. 

G. 2' . inches deep for back seam. 
H. 4 inches deep for forepart seam. 
Now draft cape as shown on diagram. 



DRAFTING A PLAIN SHOULDER CAPE. 



A. Draw a line. 

B. Place 3rour back pattern with top on 
line and move 2 inches forward in waist. 

D toC. 



The eighth part of full bust meas- 
Shoulder piece i';; inches wide on 
Shoulder piece 3' ^ inches wide on 



ure. 

C toE. 
top. 

O to F. 

bottom. 

F to Gr. I inch less as there is from D to C. 
Now break off from shoulder forepart pattern 
same as allowed for shoulder piece, from C to 
E and O to F. Draft your cape as shown on 
diagram. 

B}^ following the rules above for cutting 
capes, we are taking the pleasure of sa^^ing that 
these rules are on solid foundation, we can assure 
a perfect fit in all cases. It gives you a perfect 
shape over the shoulder, balancing your cape 
straight down in front and back with plenty of 
room for the arms underneath. 




24 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 9. 



DRAFTING A CIRCULAR. 



WlTJl UK WITHOUT VEST. 



A. In the centre between back on bust 
line. 

B From X. The full bust measure, 36 in- 
ches, draw a line from A to B, this gives 3^ou 
the spring of cape. 

C. iy< inches above A for notch on cape; 
the notch must meet in putting the garment 
together with notch on back with bust line. 

D. Measure the distance from bust to 
waist line and apply the same from C to D. 

E. Measure the distance from waist line 
to full length of garment, and appl}^ the same 
from D to E, for length of cape. 

Front to be cut same as given on plate 6. 




THE VEST. 



( See Darts, 



■)■ 



F. For front of cape 4 inches from X. 

G. About 5 inches from F, for lap of cape 
over vest. Cut the length of side bodies about 
3 inches below waist. If vest with sleeve cut 
)'Our back side up to shoulder seam (see dia- 
gram). Other divisions for sides and front 
dart same as on Plate 3. 




Newmarket with cape combined to be cut 
in the same rule, bringing side body all away 
down, as given on Plate 6, and cutting the 
cape short. 



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2f) 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 10. 

CUTTING THE SKIRT GARMENT. 




Following the rules given below for cutting 
a skirt for any garment, either short or long, 
3^ou will have no trouble at all in fitting the gar- 
ment on your customer, as the following rules 
are ver}^ simple in its construction and gives 
best result. 

In cutting a skirt garment, cut a plain gar- 
ment out first with side bodies all away down, 
measuring the hip, seat, etc. , as your measure- 
ments calls for. 

A and B. Place your forepart and side to- 
gether; lap a seam over each other; begin the 
seam 4 inches below waist. 

C and D. Placing back side body together 
with other side body, same as A and B. After 
doing this common sense will teach 3'ou how 
skirt is cut. See Diagram. 

E. For a jacket, commence your skirt 2'; 
inches below waist; for newmarket, 3 inches. 

F. From 4% to 6 inches below waist. This 
point is more a matter of taste and style. 

G. From F to G same as taken out in front 
dart O. 

Front length of skirt same as back. 

Make a V in skirt straight with front and 
side seam in order to bring the shape on the 
hip. 

Fig. I. — This represents how a lapel is cut 
for double breasted tailor made garment. Cut 
the same 3 inches wide on bust, iV^ inches on 
waist and from 2", to 3 inches on top. 





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DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 11. 



THE MEASUREMENTS AND DRAFTING 



OF LADIES KIDING TROUSERS. 



In measuring a lady for trousers let her sit 
on a chair, as shown in Fig. i . In order to get 
rise to the measure. Other measures can be 
measured while the lad}" is standing up. 
Measurements requiring for Ladies' Riding 
Trousers is as follows : 

Waist, say 24 inches ; hip, 6 inches below 
waist, sa}^ 43 inches ; rise, say 1 2 inches ; lap, 
sa}" 2 2 inches ; total length to the sole of foot, 
say 42 inches. Knee measure may be cut V, 
inch less than the half part of bust. Bottom of 
trousers may be measured on lad3% or you 
can cut the same ", of an inch less than the 
knee. 



FULL MEASUREMENTS. 



Waist, 


- . 


- 


24 inches 


Hip, - 


- 


- 


- 43 


Rise, 


- 


- 


12 


Lap, 


- 


- 


- 22 ' ' 


Length, 


- 


- 


42 


Knee, - 


. 


- 


- 16K " 


Bottom, 






16 



DRAFTING THE TROUSERS. 

1, Draw a line. 

2. Square line 2 by line i. 

3- Rise measure, 1 2 inches from 2 to 3. 

4. Lap measure, 22 inches from 2 to 4. 

5. Length, 42 inches from line 2 to 6. 



6. Hip measure, 43 inches. Apply the 
fourth part from line i to 6 on line 3. Square 
a line from this point and line 3. 

7. From point 6 to 7 the third part of the 
distance as there is from line i to 6. 

8. Waist measure 24 inches. Appl}' the 
fourth part and allow 1% inches to it from line 
6 to 8. 

Central line in the centre between point 7 
and line i. 

9. The fourth part of the knee measure 
from central line. 



10. From 9 to 10 one-half of knee meas- 



ure. 



11. 
12. 



3/', inches from central line to 1 1. 

7 inches from 11 to 12. 

X. From point 6 to X, the half of the dis- 
tance as there is from 6 to 7. 

Now draw front as shown on diao-ram. 



DRAFTING THE BACK PART. 

A. Allow I inch above point 7. 

B. From line 2 to B, same as there is from 
central line to 6. 

C. From B to C, the fourth part of waist 
and allow 2 inches. 

D. I inch from line i. 

E. % of an inch from point 9 to E for seam. 

F. From 10 to F, same as from 9 to E. 

G. Bottom measure 16 inches. Appl}-^ 
half of the measure and allow % of an inch to 
it from point 1 2 to G. 

H. From 11 to H, the same as from 12 to 
G. Now draw back part, as shown on diagram. 
Cut two V's out in top of back part to fit the 
waist. 



DITTMAR & SHEIFERS SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 12. 

LADIES' RIDING HABITS. 



The representation of ladies' riding habits 
are selected from man)^ examined by us, and 
combine simplicit}^ and elegance. The}' repre- 
sent the costumes most generall}^ worn b}' ladies, 
although there are very many other styles, 
which vary according to the individual taste of 
the wearers. 

Horsback riding of late 3^ears has become 
a very fashionable pastime, and our avenues 
and Central Park are crowded with equestrians 
early in the mornings and late of evenings. 

Ladies especially within the past few years 
are much given to this health}^ exercise, and 
our riding schools are filled with pupils learn- 
ing the art of horseback riding. 



\ i 







The skirt of this habit is much shorter than 
those of former 3'ears, and is made with very 
little draper3\ It is mostl}' worn with trousers 
made from the same material as the habit, or 
from black doeskin. 

Riding habits are mostly made from light- 
weight cloths — brown, dark green, blue, and 
similar colors predominating in favor. 

Fifteen years past cutting a riding skirt 
was ver}' eas3^ there was no s^^stem to it, onl}' 
plain, straight pieces of cloth cut about 6 
inches longer than sole of foot. The top was 
gathered to fit the waist, that finished it. But 
at the present time we can be proud of sa3dng 
that riding skirt cutting is done to fine point, 
systematioelly, as the body of a garment. 
Away with all fullness ! What does not require 
fitting smooth on the lad}''s lap, and when 
mounted no wrinkles above or below the knees. 
Elastic should be used for right and left lap to 
keep the skirt in firm when riding. 

On the opposite page we represent a diagram 
of a most serviceable riding skirt, excellent in its 
styde and fit, and one of the leading in Paris, 
London and New York. 

Measurements for skirt to be used same as 
for trousers, with the extras of front and back 
from waist to sole of foot. 



FULL MEASUREMENTS. 



Waist, 


- 


- 


24 


Seat, 


- 


- 


- 42 


Rise, 


- 


- 


12 


Lap, 


- 


- 


22 


Side Length, 


- 


- 


42 


Front Length, - 


- 


- ■ 


- 42 


Back. 






45 



inches. 



DRAFTING THE SKIRT. 

1. Draw a line. 

2. Square line 2 b}^ i. 

3. Rise measure, 12 inches. Apply 12 
inches from line 2 to 3. 

(continued on page 32). 






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32 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



(concluded from PAGE 30). 

4. Waist measure, 24 inches. Appl}" the 
fourth part (6 inches) from line 1 to 4, on line 2. 

5. From 4 to 5 ; again the fourth part of 
waist. 

6. From 5 to 6, the eighth part of waist. 
Make a V from points 5 and 6. 

7. From 5 to 7, the half of waist. 

8. Seat measure, 43 inches. Appl}" half 
from line i to 8 on line 3. 

9. From 8 to 9, the third part as there is 
from line i to point 8. Now draw a line down 
from point 7 and point 9. 

10. From 9 to 10, the third part as there 
is from 9 to 8. Now draw a line down from 
point 7 and point 10. 

11. 2 inches below point 5. 

12. 2 inches below point 6. 

13. 1 inch below point 7. 

14. Side length, 42 inches from point 7. 

15. Front length, 42 inches from top and 
centre between points 12 and 13. 

16. Back length, 45 inches from point 4 
to 16. 

17. Lap measure, 22 inches from point 1 1. 

18. About 6 inches, for V on knee, from 
17 make V 6 inches deep. (Don't cut the same 
out before skirt is tried on.) Cut the left part 
about 6 inches longer on side in order to cover 
the left foot when mounted (see darts on bottom 
of diagram). 

In cutting the cloth for riding skirt be care- 
ful to place your pattern on cloth with right 
and left part ; make an allowance of 3' , inches 
on bottom for a hem. Opening for skirt to be 
made straight with the V. 



Plate 13. 

CUTTING A NEWMARKET 



FROM A JACKET OR OTHER SHORT GARMENT. 



Fig. I. 



DRAFTING THE BACK. 



A. Draw a line a little over the length 
measure of newmarket. 

B. Place top of back on line A, and i inch 
upward in waist. 



C. The full length of newmarket, and 
allow I inch for making up from top of back. 

D. Width of Back on bottom, i\> inches 
less than the sixth part of bust measure, saj^ 4'/ 
inches, if 36 inches bust, from C to D. 

Now draw back, as shown on diagram. 



Fig. 2. 



DRAFTING THE SIDE-BODY. 



Draw a line. 

E. Place side-body ^; of an inch upward 
in waist, and with the blade on line. 

F. From E to F same as there is from B 
to C (see Fig. i). 

G. Width of side-body the fourth part of 
bust measure, and allow 1'/ inches to it, 10% 
inches, if 36 inches bust. 

Now draw side-body, as shown on diagram. 



t^ig- 3- 



DRAFTING THE FOREPART. 



Draw a line and place 3'our forepart on the 
line, as shown on diagram. 

H. Place front-side i inch back from fore- 
part. 

I. Side from forepart i'/ inches at the 
waist. 

J. Make allowance outside of side-body 
same as the lap of side-body over forepart. 

K, Length of front. This may be meas- 
ured on customer and applied on draft, or make 
your front 2'/, to 3/; inches shorter than the back 
length. 

L. Width of forepart half of seat measure, 
say 23 inches, if 46 inches seat. Length of side 
to correspond with back side body. 

M. Depth of front dart 7 inches below 
waist. 

O. Depth of side dart 3', inches below 
waist. Make allowance on front for lap. 



Fig. 4. 

This diagram represents how a shoulder 
yoke is cut for any st3de, either cape or circu- 
lar. Place forepart and back of any garment 
together with the shoulder seams, then draft 
your yoke, as shown on diagram. 



34 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 14. 

CUTTING A WRAP FROM A PLAIN 
JACKET, ETC. 



This system of cutting a wrap, given below, 
is a supplement to one already given on page 
20 and plate 7. But to make this book more 
valuable we present 3^ou the below instructions 
of cutting a wrap sleeve from a plain coat sleeve 
which will save 3^ou time in cutting and fitting 
the wrap for a customer. You have a jacket or 
a waist fitted already. 



Fig. 1. 



DRAFTING THE SLEEVE. 



A. Place back and sleeve together as 
shown on diagram. 

B. To be placed level with point A. 

C. Draw a line up from point B, elbow of 
sleeve. 

E. Measure from C to D, and apply the 
same from C to E, on line C. 

F. Notcb for sleeve ^/ of an inch below 
coat sleeve notch. Now draw your wrap sleeve 
as shown on diagram. 



THE BACK. 



Cut your back about '/ of an inch narrower 
on the shoulder as the regular coat back, and 
about 1 inch wider to back on the waist. 



THE FOREPART. 



In altering the forepart take off % of an inch 
on the width of shoulder, and the armhole 2 
inches lower from the regular. 



THE SIDEBODY. 



For wrap cut to correspond with forepart. 
Under sleeve and C, see Page 20. 



ITS SWIFTNESS OF EXECUTION OF THE ABOVE SYSTEM. 

In these da3"s of hurr3^ when time is reck- 
oned so valuable that minutes as well as hours 
are considered, we all aim to economize time as 
much as possible; "time is mone}%" therefore 
it is desirable in selecting a S3^stem to get one 
that produces good results and consumes the 
least time in drafting the garment, for in so do- 
ing we are selecting the best-taving S3^stem. 

This system is not onl3^ simple in its con- 
struction, reliable in its results, but occupies 
less time to cut a correct wrap than an3" other 
offered. Hence it is pre-eminenth^ to 3^our ad- 
vantage to learn it, for "econoni3' is wealth." 



"DECOY DUCKS." 



' ' Deco3^ Ducks " are very properly described 
b3^ an observing friend as "the prominent per- 
sons whose names appear as patrons, trustees, 
etc.," of the various weak institutions that are 
begging for public consideration. 

Ver3^ frequentl3^ this trick and device is 
resorted to b3^ unscrupulous persons to foist up- 
on the uninitiated and unsuspecting public, 
bogus institutions, and not unfrequentl3' the 
names of prominent individuals are used with- 
out their knowledge or consent. As an illus- 
tration of this fact we refer you to the case of 
the bogus Medical Institute of (Philadelphia, which 
was publicl3^ exposed after existing for years 
upon the moral support given it b3^ the illegal 
use of the names of popular men throughout 
the country. But in time all this rascalit3' is 
exposed and the institutions resorting to such 
mean expedients are landed upon the rocks of 
adversity hopeless wrecks. 

(continued on I'AGE 36.) 



36 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 15. 

OUR FAVORABLE DESIGN FOR SEAL 
PLUSH, ETC. 



This style of cutting 
wraps, as shown on dia- 
gram, is very favorable 
mostly in cases of seal or 
seal plush. It is our stan- 
dard design, and ver}' 
valuable as it saves much 
of material on account of 
lower side and sleeve be- 
ing cut in one piece. 
Short side bodies (see 

darts ) cut about 

3"; inches below waist to 
be put under the arm in 
order to hold the forepart 
in shape. This can be 
cut of silk or farmersatin 
or any other suitable ma- 
terial. An elastic band 
can be placed under the 
arm and waist to answer the same purpose. 




THE DRAFTING. 

Draft your back and forepart same as given 
on page 20, and Plate 7. 

A. To form the sleeve about 5 inches 
below waist. 

B. The fourth part of bust and allow 1% 
inches from point A to B for width of side. 
Now draw a straight line down, this will give 
you width of side on bottom. 

C. From B to C, 3/; inches, apply your 
seat measure on back side and forepart, if not 
enough as measure calls for, make allowance 
from B to C, if more than measure calls for, 
break off from point C. Now draw your fore- 
part and break oft' bottom 3"^ inches from back 
to forepart on account of side being wider. 

D. From i ' , to 2 inches for turn up from 
B. Make front of upper sleeve about 12 inches 
wide. 



E. From C. to E same as there is from B 
to D. Make the under sleeve same length as 
upper and 4 inches narrower in front than the 
upper. 

Short wraps can be cut in the same way ; 
sleeve and lower side in one piece and upper 
side bodies to be put in from lining in order to 
save valuable material. (See dots on Diagram 
.) 



(concluded from page 34,) 
"DECOY DUCKS." 



Some of these "decoy dvicks" are of solid 
wood, even to the head, while others extremely 
hollow are of brass, but one kind is just as mis- 
chievous as the other, and both need watching 
at this time, especially, for the prosperous sea- 
son has brought out a great many hunters after 
snug surpluses that numerous people have 
begun to accumulate. "A wink is as good as 
a nod to a blind horse." To make the applica- 
tion of the above remarks more plain and clear 
to Ihe hasty reader we would impress upon his 
mind that not all the names printed and used 
by certain persons are used with the consent of 
the individuals, but they are illegally used and 
purposely published as decoys to deceive the un- 
wary public. Their object is like that of the 
spider to the fly — they aim to get you in their 
clutches, and for this purpose flamingly publish 
the names of prominent individuals as trustees, 
etc., and use these names as "decoy ducks." 

We would advise you to give them ' ' a wide 
berth," for so sure as you allow them to fasten 
their fangs upon you, you are a victim to their 
unscrupulous thirst for money, and they will 
fleece you without mercy. Listen not to their 
siren songs, but if you should be lulled by their 
cadence for a moment, shake off your lethargy 
and remember the warnings we have given you. 

All interested persons who desire to know 
"the bone and sinew " of the Tailors' and Cut- 
ters' Exchange can have full particulars upon 
application at our offlce. But we publish no 
names — We use no "Decoy Ducks." 



38 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate IG. 



THE JERSEY WAIST. 



IMPORTANCE FOR CUTTING JERSEY MATERIAL. 



Allowance must be made at the length of 
waist from ' , to i inch according to stretching 
of the material ; the same allowance must be 
made on front balance. Allow from "/g to % to 
nape measure. Reductions must be made in 
bust, waist and hip. 



DRAFTING A JERSEY WAIST. 

A. Length of shoulder, say 3% inches for 
a 36 inch bust. 

B to 0. Take out i inch. 

D to E. Take out i inch. This is done to 
make allowance for the stretching, 

F. Take out from armhole in front 2',, 
inches. Waist to be cut in the same wa_v as 
bust, 2 inches less than the measure. Armhole 
to be cut not lower than bust line. All other 
points to be done the same as other garment. 

H. If forepart is wanted without a dart 
take I inch from straight line. 

G, ' ^ inch less than the fourth part of 
waist measure from H to G. 



DRAFTINGA ONE SEAM SLEEVE FOR JERSEY. 

1. Draw a line. 

2. Square by line i. 

3. The fourth part of bust measure from 
line 1 to 3. 

4 and 5. Same as other sleeve, 

6. From line 3 to 6 the fourth part as 
there is from line i to 3. 

7. From line i to 7 the same as there is 
from line 3 to 6. 

X. Length of sleeve same as other. 

8. i'/^ inches from point X to 8. 



9. Width of bottom, i inch less than the 
fourth part of bust measure. Now draw your 
sleeve from point 6 to 8 with about % of an inch 
allowance, and 7 to 9 about i inch curve. 

Sleeve for jersey waist can also be cut plain 
with two seams. 



OUR SYSTEM OF SHIRT CUTTING. 



Each 3^ear has produced improved systems 
for cutting shirts, and every 3?ear there is a 
growing demand for shirt-cutters of talent, to 
whom large salaries are paid ; in fact, the shirt- 
cutter's pay rivals that of the tailor's, and as 
this demand increases for expert shirt-cutters, 
it is well for 3^oung men to give it their atten- 
tion. 

One of the simplest, most perfect, and reli- 
able shirt systems we have is one recently 
invented by Messrs. Dittmar & Sheifer, of the 
Tailors' and Cutters' Exchange, which possesses 
real merit. A gentleman, recognized as one of 
the best shirt-cutters in this country, after 
witnessing the swiftness with which it per- 
formed its duty, acknowledged that it surpassed 
anything in its line he had ever examined, and, 
to test its correctness, drafted a pattern by his 
method, which took exactly twice as much time 
as that occupied by us in drafting one by our 
system, and, upon laying these patterns upon 
each other, it was found, to the surprise of all 
present, that the}^ corresponded in every part ; 
in fact, so near alike were they that any person 
would have believed that one pattern was 
copied from the other. 

This business of shirt-cutting is assuming 
vast proportions, and an}^ one not familiar with 
the subject, and who has given the subject no 
thought, would be surprised to realize the extent 
of talent, capital, etc., invested. 

We are prepared to teach our system of 
shirt-cutting to any person desirous of learning, 
or we will sell drafts of it for self-instruction. 



40 



UITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 17. 

THE FULL VEST WITH BACK. 



Fig r. 

18 to 19, Allow i"/ inches for seams. 

A. Forepart i;^ inches from central line. 
Draw 3^our forepart from this point and curve 
it in to the waist, touching on the central line. 
Now take out ^\ of an inch between forepart 
and back, on bust line, and 2 inches on waist 
line. 

Forepart and back darts to be taken out 
according to waist measure, by measuring the 
forepart from point to central line. Deduct the 
fourth part of waist measure and take out the 
balance on dart, making allowance for seams ; 
back is done the same way. 

Length of forepart in front is cut from 5 to 
7 inches below waist according to taste and 
st3de ; side length, 2 inches below waist. 



THE PLAITED GARMENTS. 



Fig. 2. 

BOX AND PLAIN PLAITS, OR ANY OTHER PLAITS. 

B}^ this illustration you will see and admit 
the simplicity of cutting plaited garments. As 
a matter of fact, when a plaited garment is 
made up you wonder how complicated it must 
be to cut such a garment ; how much you 
should allow for this and that, box or plain 
plaits. But after you have the idea we give 
you will think different. 

In cutting a plaited garment take a piece 
of paper, make your plait on the paper to suit 
}^ourself, any style you prefer, then place 5^our 
pattern on the paper with the folded plait, as 
shown on diagram ; cut the same- out with the 
fold. Now spread your pattern apart (see fig. 
4), this way you cut the cloth, not forgetting 
notches for plaits. 



Fig 3 and 4 represents a forepart with plain 
plaits. Fig. 3 when plaits is formed and pattern 
marked on it. Fig. 4 when the same is spread 
open. 



THE COMBINATION OF STYLE AND. 
COLORS. 



This is a subject of vital importance which 
is too often neglected by the cutters — that is, 
to make a study of the effect of the combina- 
tion of colors and their bearing upon the st3des 
of garments most becoming to the various cus- 
tomers. 

A lady who is short and thick requires a 
different character of garment from one who is 
tall and slender. While one color, or certain 
combinations of colors, will have a pleasing 
effect upon one, the same upon the other will 
have a contrar}^ effect. 

A short and stout woman will go to her 
tailor wanting a certain style of goods made 
into a certain st3de of garment. She wants it 
because she saw a suit similar m eveiy respect 
upon her well-shaped and tall friend, which was 
ver3^ becoming to her. The goods are pur- 
chased and the garments made, but the short 
customer is dissatisfied, and insists that the suit 
does not fit, and she is not at all pleased with 
its appearance. The cutter examines the suit, 
and is surprised at this adverse criticism — it 
does fit in every respect, and, as the points of its 
perfection are pointed out to the customer one 
b3^ one, and she is shown that the suit is fault- 
less, she reluctantly admits the force of the 
argument, but insists that it looks entirel3' 
different upon her from her well-proportioned 
friend, and wonders why the difference is so 
apparent and the garments so ill-becoming to 
her. Not once has the vast difference in the 
(continued on page 42.) 



4- 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 18. 



THE POLERINA CAPE. — CUTTING A 



RUSSIAN CIRCULAR. 



Fig. r. 

This diagram represents the old fashion 
polerina cape. This garment which has been 
worn by our grand mothers and great grand 
mothers has been forgotten for a good many 
}^ears past. But this season of 1891 it comes 
back to us like a long lost child ; it is favorable 
in every respect and admired by all classes of 
people as a comfortable and fashionable gar- 
ment as a street costume for spring and sum- 
mer ; very easy to cut (if you know how), 
easy to make and noble in its appearance. 

All measurement required for the above 
is neck and length. Sa)^ 15 inches neck meas- 
ure, take a 36 size pattern and place on your 
back and forepart together with the shoulder 
seam, as shown on diagram, this is all it needs. 
Now mark 3"0ur cape, as shown on diagram, 
straight with back and forepart. 



Fig. 



THE RUSSIAN CIRCULAR. 



The top part of the circular is cut the same 
as the plain shoulder cape, given on Plate 8, 
page 22. Length of back according to measure 
on the straight line. Bottom of circular to be 
cut the full bust measure and allow the sixth 
part of the bust to it (for half of circular). 
Front is cut either by measure or 3 inches 
shorter than back. 



(concluded from page 40.) 



THE COMBINATION OF STYLES AND 



COLORS. 



shape and style of the customer impressed itself 
upon his mind. A little thought upon her part, 
or a few well-considered suggestions from the 
cutter upon this subject, would have convinced 
her of her error in ordering such shades of 
goods or styles of garments. But the customer 
alone is not to blame in the majority of cases, 
for the cutter, who stood silently b}^ and ac- 
quiesced in his selection, should be charged 
with blame for making up the garments v/ith- 
out offering a protest. Sorry am I to say it, 
but it is true that not every cutter is sufficiently 
educated on this important subject to offer ad- 
vice, and, through this culpable ignorance, neg- 
lects an important duty to the customer. A 
doctor who is ignorant in any important part 
of his profession would be denominated ' ' incom- 
petent. " A lawyer who had neglected to inform 
himself thoroughly upon the ethics of his pro- 
fession would be called "non-compos," and a 
cutter who so neglects this important part of 
his education will never attain eminence. He 
should so thoroughly study this subject that 
the moment he inspects a customer he should 
be able to decide without hesitation and cor- 
rectly not onl}^ the style of garment most becom- 
ing, but the style of goods and shade of color 
most desirable and suitable for his shape, size, 
style, and complexion. All these points are 
necessary to be comprehended and duly studied, 
and the cutter who studies them most compre- 
hensibl}^ and acquires a due appreciation of their 
bearing will prove the most successful, and, 
finally, attain eminence, distinction, and 
wealth. 



< 

LU 

O 



"CD 




44 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 19. 



CUTTING A PLAIN SKIRT 



FOR STREET OR DRESS COSTUME. 



Measurements re<]ttired for cutting a ladj^'s 
skirt are as follows : 



Waist, say 
Seat, ■■ 
Front length, say 
Back length, say 



24. 

45- 
42. 

45- 



DRAFTING, 

1 and 2. Square line. 

A. The full waist measure from line i 
to A. 

B. The fourth part of waist measure from 
line 2 to B. 

C. Front length measure 42 inches. Ap- 
pl}^ 42 inches from point B. to C. 

D. The fourth part of seat measure from 
C to D. Square line up from point D and 
line I. 

E. The fourth part of waist measure from 
point B to E. 

F. In the centre between E and A. 

G. In the centre between E and F. 

H. Seat measure 45 inches. Apply 45 
inches from point D to H. 

I. One inch less than the half of waist 
measure from point D to I. 

J. From H to J the same as from D to 1. 

K. In the centre between I and J. Now 
draw lines from points E, 1, G, K, and F and J. 

L. I inch above point A. 

M. Back length, 45 inches. Appl}^ 45 
inches from point L to M. Now curve the 
bottom of skirt from point C to M, as shown on 
diagram. 



CUTTING THE MATERIAL. 

In cutting the material for skirt allow about 
i'/, inches on top of waist; cut the front piece 
in crease and make a V on top of waist in order 
to fit the stomach properly. Back piece is cut 
single. Side pieces ma}' be cut one opposite the 
other in order to cut the material to the best 
advantage. This can only be done if the material 
does not shade and there is no nap to the same. 

Narrow skirt can also be cut with one side 
piece. By doing so points A and H should be 
applied /s of the measure legs, and points G and 
K is let out. 



INSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 

/leademy for Vqz f\r{ of QjttiQi^ 

OF THE 

TAILORS' AND GUTTERS' EXCHANGE, 

758 BROADWAY. 

DITTMAR & SHEIFER, - - . . 



Directors. 



XERMS FOR INSTRUCTION. 



Terms for a complete course of Instruction in Ladies' Garments, 
includiug grading, to Practical Tailors, Furriers, or 
Dressmakers, . . . . . $100.00 

toothers, . - - - - - - 150.00 

for Grading all Ladies' Outside Garments, - - 50.00 

for a comjJete course of Instruction in Gentlemen's Gar- 
ments, ...... 100.00 

Practical Tailors, .-..-- 50.00 

for Grading, ------ 50.00 

to Cutters desiring to change their S5-stem, - - 50.00 

to Cutters for Coat System alone, - - - 30.00 

to Cutters for Pants System alone, - - - - 20.00 

to Cutters for Vest System alone, - - - 15.00 

for Instruction in measviring, drafting, or explaining points 

occupying from one hour to one day - $500 to 20.00 



L.\DiEs' Undergarments. 



Terms for Cutters, 
for others. 



Gents' Shirts, Unoerg.vrments .\nd Over.-vlls. 

Terms for Cutters, ------ 

for others, ------ 

for Grading, ------ 

for Gentlemen's Dress .Shirts only, 

Tititioti must he paid in advance in all cases. 



g25.oo 
50.00 



$50,00 
75.00 
50.00 
25.00 



u 



IM 



at 



O) 



d 



(=^ 



d 
c 






w 



w. 



;;.?. 



46 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 



Plate 20. 

THE DRESS WAIST. 

WITIinUT SEAMS, SUITABLE FOR SILK, CLOTH OR ANY 
OTHER MATERIAL. 



The cutting of a dress waist, wliicli is pre- 
sented on opposite diagram, is far superior to 
all others ; its shapes and curves for the human 
form cannot be equaled. As a laile by all dress- 
makers and ladies' tailors, this pattern is cut 
without seams, and by cutting the material, 
seams including, outlets are allowed. To do 
this, lining is perforated with a tracing wheel 
right on the lines of your draft than allow- 
ance is made. 



THE DRAFTING. 

1 8, the half of bust measure, no allowance 
above. 

A. I inch below point 1 7, for neck shoul- 
der point. 

B. Forepart to be placed i'/ inches below 
line 3. If 3 side-bodies preferred take i inch 
below line 3, draw a line down for forepart. 

C. From the front of forepart to C, the 
third part as there is from line 3 to front of 
forepart. 

D. From C to D, i inch less as there is 
from front to C. 

E. Allow I inch from straight line. Now 
draw a line from point 18 down by point E. 
Shape your front as shown on diagram. 

Front darts to be taken out by measuring 
from point E to B. Deduct the fourth part of 
waist (6 inches) and take out balance of meas- 
ure of front darts. 

F. From line 3, >, of an inch for armhole. 



Cut the back for dress waist % of an inch 
below point 13, and from y^ to i inch wide on 
waistline; take out ly, inches from back to side. 
Side-bodies, if two or three to be divided 
ecjually, shoulder should be cut very narrow 
for waist, say 3'; inches. 



THE SLEEVE. 



Ficr. 



Draft your points same as given on Plate 4. 
Hollow the elbow 2 inches in front and about 
I '/ inches in back for upper-sleeve. Draw your 
under-sleeve in the centre of upper on elbow. 
Bottom of sleeve to be cut i inch less than the 
fourth part of bust measure. Notches should 
be placed on both upper and under, about 3 
inches above and below elbow in order to bring 
the fullness of the elbow in its right position. 

Baggy, plaited, fancy or any other sleeve 
can be very easily put on the top of the plain 
lining, as the lining of sleeve must have its 
regular form to fit on the arm. 



A FEW WORDS TO THE GRADUATE. 



The principles of all ladies' garments are 
represented in this book. To produce other 
designs, such as plaiting on ornamental gar- 
ment, can easily be brought out (after i-eading 
and thoroughl}^ understanding this book) b}^ 
using your own judgment — of course, taste and 
ability is necessary. 

Should you misunderstand any of the in- 
structions, we shall take the pleasure of for- 
warding further explanations on application 
within six months after book is purchased. 

Yours Respectfull3% 

DITT^L\R & ShF.IFER. 



48 



DITTMAR & SHEIFER'S SELF-BALANCING SYSTEM. 




Page. 

Custom and Wholesale Department, (illustrated) 3 

Preface 4 

Its Simplicity 4 

Its Reliability 4 

Its Swiftness of E.xecution 4 

Our System of Cutting 5 

Tailors and Cutters E.xchange 6 

The Power of Memory 6 

The Dignity of Tailoring 7 

A Word to Cutters and Tailors 7 

The Measurements 8- 

Drafting the Outlines '. . . . 10 

Drafting a Garment 12 

Cutting out the Pattern 12 

Importance after Cutting out 12 

Drafting a Sleeve 14 

Drafting the Collars 14 

Special Notice 14 

Drafting a Loose Front Garment 16 

The Vest 16 

The Beauty of a Garment 16 

The Pecuniary Value of Taste 16 

Drafting a Plush Garment 18 

Drafting Bottom of a Sack or Newmarket 18 

Special to Furriers 18 

Our Success with Furriers 18 

Drafting a Wrap 20 

Drafting 20 

The Japanese Sleeve 20 



I p^JlJtj! 



Page. 

Cutting the Shoulder Capes 22 

Drafting a High Shoulder Cape 22 

Drafting a Circular 24 

The Vest 24 

Cutting the Skirt Garment 26 

Ladies' Riding Trousers, the Measurements and 

Drafting 28 

Drafting the Trousers 28 

Drafting the Back Part 28 

Ladies' Riding Habits 30 

Full Measurements 30 

Drafting the Skirt , 3°-3- 

Cutting a Newmarket from a Jacket or Other Short 

Garments 32 

Drafting Side Body 32 

Drafting the Forepart 32 

Decoy Ducks 34 

Cutting a Wrap from a Plain Jacket 34-36 

Our favorable design for Seal Plush, etc 36 

The Jersey Waist 38 

The Full Vest with back 40 

The Plaited Garments 40 

The Combination of Style and Colors 40-42 

The Polerina Cape — Cutting a Russian Circular-. ... 42 

Cutting a Plain Skirt 44 

Instruction Department of the Academy for the Art 

of Cutting 44 

The Dress Waist 46 

A Few Words to the Graduate 46 








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